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Plunket and Contact – keeping kiwi kids safe in cars

Contact Energy has joined with Plunket to help families in need prepare for upcoming changes to child restraint laws with a contribution of $25,000 to Plunket’s car seat service.

From 1 November the mandatory use of child restraints in vehicles will be extended by two years, with all children required to be correctly secured in an approved restraint until their seventh birthday.

Plunket National Child Safety Advisor, Sue Campbell, says Plunket fully supports the law change but realize that it will place a financial strain on many families.

“Car crashes are one of the biggest dangers to New Zealand children. We have one of the highest child road fatality rates in the OECD. We know that car seats and booster seats save lives.

“Unfortunately, for some families, even a very low rental fee is beyond what they can afford. We believe that every child deserves protection, and this generous gift from Contact Energy will make a huge difference to families in need” she said.

Contact recently won the Excellence in Health and Safety category at the prestigious Deloitte Energy Excellence Awards.

Nicholas Robinson, Contact’s General Manager Customer Insight, Marketing and Communications, said that the health and safety of Contact’s people is central to everything they do and they wanted to mark the recent achievement by giving back to a deserving community organisation.

“Plunket has a long, proud history of keeping kiwi kids safe and we’re thrilled to be able to support this iconic Kiwi organisation.

“Given Plunket’s work to help New Zealand families keep their children safe when in vehicles, it was fitting for Contact, a company that has a strong focus on health and safety, to lend our support.”

Plunket's car seat service offers a variety of affordable infant and child restraints available for short- and long-term hire and for purchase.

For more information on about car safety and which type of car seat restraint is best for your child visit http://plunket.org.nz/your-child/safety/car-safety/

Photo opportunity

Monday 21 October, 10.45am

Cannon’s Creek Plunket Hub, 31 Warspite Ave, Porirua

Followed by a roadside check where up to 25 booster seats will be given away:
Monday 21 October, 11.30am, Rugby Park, 104 Mungavin Ave, Porirua

For more information contact:

Nikki Prendergast - Plunket Media Manager 
021 405 842
nikki.prendergast@plunket.org.nz

Emily Pederson - Communications Advisor, Contact Energy
027 323 0896
emily.pederson@contactenergy.co.nz

FAQ - Why use booster seats?

Adult seat belts are designed for adults – they don’t fit children properly until they are at least 148cm tall (4’10”).

Without a booster seat, an adult seat belt sits too high on a child. The lap part of the belt rides up over their tummy and the sash part lies across the neck. In a crash this can result in serious head and spinal cord injuries and horrific injuries to the abdomen including ruptured livers and spleens.

What booster seats do is raise children up and position them so that they get the full safety benefit of the adult seat belt.

Research shows that a child should remain in a booster seat until around 148cm tall. For the majority of children this is somewhere between 9 and 12 years of age.

For more information visit plunket.org.nz or safekids.org.nz

About Contact Energy

Contact is one of New Zealand’s largest electricity generators and retailers. We keep the lights burning, the hot water flowing and the BBQ fired up for around 566,000 customer across the country. Powering the country with electricity, natural gas and LPG, our team of around 1,100 lives, works and operates in communities throughout New Zealand. www.contactenergy.co.nz

 

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