Preventing mould in your home this winter

EECA.LIB.mould 2

With nearly half of New Zealand houses having visible mould,* how do we eliminate this problem? 

EECA Energywise says New Zealand’s relatively damp, maritime climate encourages mould growth but mould is worse in houses that aren’t ventilated or heated adequately.

To help prevent mould, technical expert Christian Hoerning says it’s important to manage moisture from everyday activities like cooking and showers with the right balance of insulation, heating and ventilation.

“It’s also important to eliminate avoidable moisture sources, such as indoor clothes drying or moisture coming in from under the house.”

“If you do get mould, clean it up with some methylated spirits or white vinegar,” he says.

Top tips for preventing mould:

  • Properly installed insulation helps keep your home warm and dry – so check if it is up to scratch and hasn’t been moved out of place.
  • Heating your home to at least 18 degrees will help prevent mould.
  • Open doors and windows a few times each day to create a cross-draught and remove moisture is a simple, free mould-prevention tactic.
  • Use extractor fans that vent to the outside in your bathroom, kitchen and laundry. Fans should not vent into your ceiling space.
  • Check for underlying sources of damp, such as leaks and broken downpipes.
  • Don’t dry your washing on racks inside – use the clothes line or a dryer that vents to the outside if it’s raining.
  • Consider installing a ground moisture barrier to prevent damp rising up from the ground under your house.
  • Avoid unflued gas heaters which release moisture into the air.

More tips on www.energywise.govt.nz

*BRANZ 2015 House Condition Survey

EECA.LIB.mould 2

With nearly half of New Zealand houses having visible mould,* how do we eliminate this problem? 

EECA Energywise says New Zealand’s relatively damp, maritime climate encourages mould growth but mould is worse in houses that aren’t ventilated or heated adequately.

To help prevent mould, technical expert Christian Hoerning says it’s important to manage moisture from everyday activities like cooking and showers with the right balance of insulation, heating and ventilation.

“It’s also important to eliminate avoidable moisture sources, such as indoor clothes drying or moisture coming in from under the house.”

“If you do get mould, clean it up with some methylated spirits or white vinegar,” he says.

Top tips for preventing mould:

  • Properly installed insulation helps keep your home warm and dry – so check if it is up to scratch and hasn’t been moved out of place.
  • Heating your home to at least 18 degrees will help prevent mould.
  • Open doors and windows a few times each day to create a cross-draught and remove moisture is a simple, free mould-prevention tactic.
  • Use extractor fans that vent to the outside in your bathroom, kitchen and laundry. Fans should not vent into your ceiling space.
  • Check for underlying sources of damp, such as leaks and broken downpipes.
  • Don’t dry your washing on racks inside – use the clothes line or a dryer that vents to the outside if it’s raining.
  • Consider installing a ground moisture barrier to prevent damp rising up from the ground under your house.
  • Avoid unflued gas heaters which release moisture into the air.

More tips on www.energywise.govt.nz

*BRANZ 2015 House Condition Survey

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