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Choosing children's nightwear

In 2008 a change was made to the labelling requirements for children’s nightwear. This is a guide to help you choose your child's nightwear.

What to look for

  • Check the label on nightwear for a “low fire danger” label. This means the design of the garment is close-fitting to reduce the risk of it catching fire, it does not mean that the fabric is fire proof, the fabric can still burn if exposed to a heat source
  • Buy pyjamas that fit your child rather than buying a size too big to make them last. A loose fit can be a fire risk
  • If making nightwear for your child choose a pattern that has a close-fitting design, ‘ski’ pyjamas are a warm and safe option

Safety labelling

Children’s nightwear is now carrying the orange label which includes a message to ‘wear snug-fitting’. The fabric is one that burns readily but the garment is of a design to reduce the risk of it catching fire and the snug-fitting message is intended to discourage the purchase of garments that are too big. The risk of fire is reduced if the garments are close to the child rather than flapping and billowing out.

The fabric is one that burns readily but the garment is of a design to reduce the risk of it catching fire and the snug-fitting message is intended to discourage the purchase of garments that are too big. The risk of fire is reduced if the garments are close to the child rather than flapping and billowing out.

Orange label

This means that the garment is made of a higher fire risk fabric and is designed to be worn snug-fitting to reduce the risk of the garment catching fire. Make sure that nightwear with this label fits children snugly.

White label

This means that the garment is a lower fire risk. It is either made of a fabric that burns more slowly, or is designed to be worn snug-fitting to reduce the risk of the garment catching fire. Buy “Low Fire Danger” labelled children’s nightwear whenever possible, but remember that “low fire danger” doesn’t mean there’s no fire danger.

Red label

This means that the garment is a higher fire risk. If you must use this type of garment, use them in summer rather than winter, as it is less likely to catch fire from a heater or fireplace.

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